5 Reasons Why Your Net Worth Is Not Your Self-Worth By Fiona Scott

5 Reasons Why Your Net Worth Is Not Your Self-Worth By Fiona Scott

Everyone’s relationship with money and material possessions is unique. It’s fair to say that having money does allow greater flexibility and choices, and having nice things is satisfying at the moment, but does it provide long term happiness? If COVID 19 and lockdown has taught us anything, it’s that we can find joy and happiness […]

-

Everyone’s relationship with money and material possessions is unique. It’s fair to say that having money does allow greater flexibility and choices, and having nice things is satisfying at the moment, but does it provide long term happiness?

If COVID 19 and lockdown has taught us anything, it’s that we can find joy and happiness in the simple things. Some may have missed the shopping, the sense of achievement, but for most, it has allowed time to really dig deep and work out what’s really important.

The crisis didn’t discriminate against net worth and that alone is a valuable lesson. Choice of home, job, relationship and how much is earned or spent does not define anyone on its own. 

There are many ways to improve self-worth regardless of net-worth. Find examples in life that are not related to possessions and money yet bring joy and fulfilment. This will often relate to a purpose, often around helping others. Sharing those moments with friends, family, and even writing them down can have huge value to someone’s wellbeing and mental health. The goal is to start associating self-worth with feelings and experiences that deserve it. Here are five suggestions for achieving this by media consultant Fiona Scott.

Start a gratitude journal

Make a commitment to record moments which have brought joy for every single day. It may sound a bit woo woo but it really works. It focuses attention and energy on the positive every single day.

Ditch people who are focused on and talk about money

If that’s the centre and only purpose of life, it’s better to surround yourself with people who share your values. You will know who these ‘money focussed’ people are since you will feel anxious about being in their company and they will often drain your energy.

Develop and deepen self-confidence

A confident person feels better about themselves, appears to stands taller, exudes positive energy, smiles more, and people are always attracted and gravitate to confidence and positive personalities. A confident person focuses on their achievements and that of others and therefore anticipates their next opportunity in life with excitement. Notice the feeling when this happens so you recognise it more often.

Start recording in writing

Even in a document on your laptop or tablet – daily achievements.  Celebrate every win, even small achievements.

Create a healthy money mantra

Here’s one as a suggestion  “My self-worth does not equal my net worth” and repeat silently often.  True self-worth is up to you and only you. Don’t allow your mission to be caught up in the acquisition of stuff. It could make for a satisfying feeling of net-worth in the moment, but not necessarily high self-worth.

Instead, make your mission to build yourself up and support those closest to you. Your internal self-worth currency will trump net-worth every single day.

 

BEYOUROWN WOMAN
Author: BEYOUROWN WOMAN

BEYOUROWNBEYOUROWNWOMAN